Working Group Sessions

Working Groups (WG)

Check back in January for a complete working group schedule!

WG1 – Industry Wide Issues

Purpose:

To explore non-discipline specific issues affecting multiple industry sectors with the aim of identifying, improving or advancing standards, trade association initiatives or joint industry projects.

Who Should Attend?

Executives, directors, managers and any persons or program leaders with the responsibility for shaping the work of their company, developing strategies to improve operational reliability and process safety or communicating pipeline safety performance.

Track Co-Chairs

  • Graham Emmerson, Enbridge
  • Danielle Demers, Danielle Demers Consulting
  • Kevin Tsang, Enbridge
  • Mojgan Karimi, CEPA

Session B - Tuesday 13:30 PM
Room: KC 303
Meaningful Metrics and Communicating Pipeline Performance

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Session Topics:

A reoccurring theme in past Banff Workshops was that trust in pipeline companies would have to be earned through: demonstrated performance; objectivity in communicating performance; and transparency with data. Building off of previous Banff sessions on the Pipeline Debate and Meaningful Metrics, this session will explore how to implement a standard framework for analyzing and communicating pipeline system safety performance.

CSA Z260 Pipeline System Safety Metrics (in draft) was developed to create industry standard metrics and terminology for:

  • communicating and reporting on pipeline safety in all sectors;
  • benchmarking between companies and across jurisdictions and industry sectors;
  • improving public understanding of industry and operator performance;
  • improving transparency and objectivity of leak and releases events; and
  • analyzing safety systems in support of continual improvement of safety barriers and controls.

Session Objectives:
Identify how the proposed CSA Z260 standard can be used towards the following goals:
1) improving transparency and accessibility to benchmarking data; and
2) building trust in agencies and organizations that report on pipeline safety and performance.

Discussion Leaders:

    • Pat Smyth, Vice President Performance, CEPA
    • Linda Daugherty, Deputy Associate Administrator, PHMSA

Co-Chairs:

  • Graham Emmerson, Mojgan Karimi

Rapporteurs:

  • Jolly (lead)
  • Stella (scribe)


Session E - Wednesday 10:30 AM
Room: KC 303
Third Party Verification and Assurance of Pipeline Safety & Reliability

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Session Topics:
The drive by all parties to see effective management systems means that pipeline operators often undergo multiple management system or Integrated Management System audits each year, from multiple regulators, independent third parties or internal audit departments. While assurance is critical to continually improving operational controls, over-auditing creates conflicting corrective action priorities, generic and oversimplified management systems, and diverts staff away from executing those same operational controls. High hazard industries such as nuclear and aviation have simplified and strengthened their assurance processes through reliance on independent third-party audits. One example of a program that has reduced redundancy of audits while maintaining a trusted standard is the International Air Transport Association’s Operational Safety Audit program. This session will examine how Pipeline Industry assurance programs can achieve greater substitutive value within an operating company’s management system.
Session Objectives:
To explore the regulatory, operational and management factors necessary for pipeline operators to have greater reliance on industry association sponsored safety management system assurance programs.

Discussion Leaders:

  • Danielle Canonico, Director Corporate Quality Assurance and Risk, Air Canada and Vice-Chair of the IATA IOSA Oversight Council
  • Aaron Duke, American Petroleum Institute
  • Adam Shelley, Director Operations, Plains Midstream Canada
  • Mojgan Karimi, Implementation Manager Integrity First, Canadian Energy Pipeline Association


Session G - Wednesday 15:30 PM
Room: KC 303
Sector Intelligence and Non-Regulatory Standards Gaps

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Session Topics:
Standards set benchmarks for safety, sustainability, quality, and consistency in industries.  They can improve safety, facilitate the production of better products and services, drive innovation and support regulation and legislation.  As an example, Canadian Standards Association, develops a range of standard based solutions, including industry best practices, guidelines, and express documents to support the petroleum and natural gas industry with the goal of in improving safety, environmental protection, and efficiencies.  This session is an outlet for participants to share experience and their thoughts on where new standards of practice or guidance can benefit industry and address new or familiar challenges.
Session Objectives:
Interactive discussions on industry needs and gaps, especially around new non-regulatory standards and best practice documents that aim to promote sharing and collaboration.  Input from the session will be presented to the CSA’s Petroleum and Natural Gas Industry Systems (PNGIS) program for further discussions
Discussion Leaders:

  • Patrick Smyth, Vice President Performance, Canadian Energy Pipeline Association
  • Graeme Felltham, Vice President Customer Experience & Innovation, Atco Pipelines and PNGIS Chair
  • Iain Colquhoun, Chief Engineer, National Energy Board of Canada


WG2 – Regulatory and Standards Development

Purpose:
This working group provides participants with:

  • Opportunity to discuss improvements of standards / regulations – what works in practice and what does not.
  • Education on the existing standards and regulations.
  • Standard and regulatory updates and expected changes.

Who Should Attend?
Technical and supervisory staff who use CSA standards and Regulations that incorporate them; including technical managers, engineers, analysts, risk management experts and any persons or program leaders who are involved in or are responsible for regulatory or standards activities, such as development and implementation of safety/management systems/integrity programs within their organizations.

Expected Results

  • Recommendations for improvements of existing standards and/or regulatory interpretations.
  • Identification of channels for communication with the regulators.
  • Improved understanding of goal oriented standards and their implementation.
  • Increased knowledge on regulatory/standard changes and pipeline performance.
  • Added perspective for the role of regulatory and industry standards

Track Co-Chairs

  • Susan Oh, CSA
  • Iain Colquhoun, National Energy Board

Mentor

  • James Ferguson, Stantec

Session A - Tuesday 10:30 AM
Room: KC 303
Regulatory Updates

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Purpose:
Provide awareness for regulatory updates since the last workshop.
Description:
Discussion of key regulatory updates since the last workshop, focusing on recent pipeline events, major incidents, regulatory requirements, and pipeline performance.
A panel of regulatory and industry experts shall be used to guide this discussion.
Expected Outcome
Increased awareness of changes to regulations and what prompted these changes. Additionally, identification of potential barriers to integration of new requirements into integrity programs.


Session C - Tuesday 15:30 PM
Room: KC 303
Z662 Changes in the New Edition – Class Locations

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Purpose:
Provide awareness of class location changes in CSA Z662, discuss challenges to implementing changes and share strategies for implementation of changes.
Description:
Building on the Monday tutorial on Z662 changes in the 2019 edition, this session will focus on changes in the standard related to Class Locations, impacts to the current class location designation system and regulatory implications.
Various regulatory and industry representatives will share their views in a panel format.
Expected Outcome
Increased awareness of changes to regulations and what prompted these changes. Additionally, identification of potential barriers to integration of new requirements into integrity programs.

References / Pre-Reading
CSA Z662-15 Oil and Gas Pipeline: https://community.csagroup.org/community/oil-and-gas/z662-view-access


Session D - Wednesday 08:30 AM
Room: KC 305
Quality Assurance for Fittings and Role of Regulation / Standards

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Purpose:
Discuss approaches to quality assurance for fittings to determine if there is a need for regulation and/or standards to enhance current industry approach(es).
Description:
This will be a panel discussion with various perspectives shared: PHMSA on US history and their approach on quality assurance, NEB on recent white paper publication and recommendations, TransCanada on the lessons learned based on their recent experience.

Expected Outcome
Identification of gaps in quality assurance for fittings and a recommendation for closure of gaps.

References / Pre-Reading
NEB White Paper published in Aug, 2018: https://www.neb-one.gc.ca/sftnvrnmnt/sft/pplnmtrls/rcmmndtnsmprvqlt/rcmmndtnsmprvqlt-eng.pdf


WG3 – Upstream Pipelines: Inspection, Corrosion, and Integrity Management

Purpose:
The working group will discuss ways to overcome the challenges of the current economic environment maintaining integrity of assets. Using existing infrastructure and facing the reality of “doing more with less” could be challenging from an integrity and regulatory perspective.
Expected Results:

  • Discuss the most common changes done to pipeline infrastructure and understand when and how engineering assessments are required. Share best practices and understand what not to do from an applications perspective.
  • Evaluate innovative ways to manage work load. Digitalization, optimization of programs, risk-based approach to integrity issues.
  • The audience will understand the difference between IMP (Integrity Management Program) and SLMS (Safety and Loss Management System) and their relationship with the changes proposed as part of the current environment challenges.

Track Co-Chairs

  • Jorge Paez, Repsol
  • Theo Abels, Blu 5

Session B - Tuesday 13:30 PM
Room: Mb Auditorium
Engineering Assessments When and How

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Purpose:
In the current economic environment operators are trying to maximize resources, use existing infrastructure and reactivate inactive assets. This session focuses on the key aspects of engineering assessments as required for reactivations, flow reversals, MOP increases, H2S increases/sweet to sour conversions and others as directed by the group discussion. The session will include interactive participation using online tools to better understand case scenarios proposed as well as regulatory requirements.
Who Should Attend?
This session should be attended by integrity professionals, operations engineers, contractors that provide engineering services and integrity managers.


Session E - Wednesday 10:30 AM
Room: MB Auditorium
Managing a ’Do more with less’ culture in the Upstream Pipelines Environment

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Purpose:
The economic environment has been challenging for the last few years and many companies have had to reduce costs, leading to budget reductions and in some cases staff reductions.

This session will discuss how companies have ‘done more with less’, maintaining the integrity of their pipelines. The session will explore innovative approaches like digitalization of information and processes, synergies with other teams and between work functions, efficiencies through prioritization and clear review of risk and optimization of mitigation and monitoring programs.
Who Should Attend?
This session should be attended by integrity professionals, operations engineers, contractors that provide engineering services and integrity managers.


Session F - Wednesday 13:30 PM
Room: MB 252
Safety and Loss Management Systems for Upstream Operators

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Purpose:
The purpose of this session is to draw a parallel between Integrity Management Programs and Safety and Loss Management Systems. During the session, attendees will discuss how in a challenging economic environment the SLMS helps maintain a safety culture and improve IMP performance. Attendees will have an opportunity to discuss recent experiences and learn about how other operators have integrated the IMP within the SLMS.
Who Should Attend?
This session should be attended by integrity professionals, operations engineers, contractors that provide engineering services and integrity managers.
Expected Outcome:
Understanding how in a challenging economic environment, the SLMS provides safety barriers that allow operators to avoid hazards from becoming incidents. The session also highlights how the IMP is one of those safety barriers.
Co-Chairs

  • Jorge Paez, Repsol
  • Theo Abels, Blu 5

Mentor

  • Jeff Fleming, ROSEN Canada


WG4 – Asset Management

Purpose:
Purpose This working group provides participants with:

  • A discussion on the use of pipeline performance measures in holistic asset integrity management, with a primary focus on predictive measures
  • A discussion on the challenges of incorporating organizational and human factors in holistic asset integrity management and regulatory experience with a pilot project identifying and collecting such safety culture indicators
  • A discussion on observed challenges with abandonment and the need for and the direction towards industry guidance documents
  • A review of the regulatory framework

Who Should Attend?
Managers, engineers, analysts, risk management experts who are involved in or are responsible for the development, implementation and / or ongoing refinement of asset management within their organizations should attend these workshops.

Expected Results:

  • Understanding of the contribution of pipeline performance measures in holistic asset integrity management
  • Awareness of application challenges of organizational and human factors in holistic asset integrity management
  • Understanding of the current status of industry guidance and the regulatory framework with regard to pipeline abandonment

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Jenny Been, National Energy Board
  • Daryl Foley, Group 10 Engineering

Session D - Wednesday 08:30 AM
Room: MB 252
Pipeline Abandonment

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Description:
In 2017, WG4’s session on Pipeline Abandonment discussed the operator experience on decommissioning of a large diameter crude oil pipeline, presenting an abandonment approach framework. Whereas research results and models from the Pipeline Abandonment Research Steering Committee (PARSC) were applied, other models were developed specific for the discussed line. Without industry guidance documents, questions remain on the common issues of collapse, the cleanliness of the pipe, and the long term impact to the public and environment, as well as on the universal application of models to other pipelines. This session will provide an overview of recent and currently ongoing research activities towards increasing our understanding of common challenges and the approaches to managing their risks. It will further discuss the abandonment of a large diameter gas pipeline, which has resulted in a review of the regulatory framework for the abandonment of pipelines and compliance oversight of abandoned pipelines.
This session will cover:

  • Update on the activities of the Pipeline Abandonment Research Steering Committee (PARSC)
  • Lessons learned from the Peace River Mainline Abandonment Project
  • Regulatory Framework for the Advanced Phases of the Pipeline Lifecycle

Discussion Leaders:

  • Waqas Hanif & Kristen MacQueen, TransCanada (on behalf of PARSC)
  • Patrick Sprague & Marie McKenney, National Energy Board
  • Dave Madden, TransCanada


Session F - Wednesday 13:30 PM
Room: KC 303
The Use of Pipeline Performance Measures in Holistic Asset Integrity Management

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Description:
In 2017, WG4 held a session on the Management of Interactive Threats. Industry experience highlighted the importance of data integration for the detection of threats through the alignment of multiple sets of data including physical pipeline characteristics, operating, inspection, and monitoring data. Advances continue to be made to detect interactive threats by inline inspection technologies through the use of multiple platforms and combining multiple individual inline inspection tool technologies in the same platform. Nonetheless, the consensus was that it is a challenge to consider all threats and interactions. There are many more threats than the nine listed in the ASME B31.8S and operators may be unaware of certain threats. Furthermore, it was indicated that prioritization is critical in managing the risk due to the dynamic nature of interacting threats. This session will discuss the use of pipeline performance measures in a holistic approach to integrity management from (i) the identification of hazards/threats and their interactions to (ii) integrity (risk) assessment to (iii) implementation of control measures. The intent is to consider the application of these measures to help overcome identified challenges in the 2017 session. The emphasis will be on leading measures that are predictive in nature.
This session will cover:

  • The coupling of lagging and leading indicators, and industry experience with leading indicators • How to efficiently, effectively, and economically identify and assess leading indicators
  • Proactive collection of data
  • How to incorporate results, lessons learned
  • Consideration of many single and interactive threats in the presence of a few dominant threats
  • Regulatory experience with leading indicators
  • Advantages of Industry standards, e.g. CSA Z260, API RP 754
  • Updated NEB pipeline performance measures

Discussion Leaders:

  • Graham Emmerson, Enbridge
  • Adnan Mahmood, Plains Midstream
  • Diana Willson, National Energy Board


Session G - Wednesday 15:30 PM
Room: MB 252
Incorporating Organizational and Human Factors in Holistic Asset Integrity Management

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Description:
This session continues the discussion of session 1, casting a wider net to include organizational factors and human factors that may be predictive of organizational vulnerabilities and threats. These factors may be described as safety culture indicators. Several phases of research by North American and International oil and gas regulators, and reviews by international industry associations, have led to the identification of a suite of such observable signals or indicators. A pilot project is now underway at the National Energy Board to identify and collect indicator evidence during typical regulatory interactions (e.g. inspections). This session will discuss the use of leading sociotechnical indicators in a holistic approach to continually improve proactive system safety management, including integrity management.
This session will cover:

  • Overview of the factors that influence the safety system – and subsequently – human reliability
  • Assessment of organizational and human factors: theoretical best practice & practical challenges
  • Safety culture signals/indicators
  • Regulatory experience piloting safety culture indicators (successes & challenges)
  • How to start examining indicators of safety culture across high-hazard industries
  • Industry experience identifying safety culture changes through Root Cause Analysis as opposed to identifying band aid solutions using an immediate cause approach

Discussion Leaders:

  • Jorge Paez, Repsol
  • Natasha Scott, National Energy Board


WG5 – Management of Cracking in Pipelines

Purpose:
Circumferential cracking issues are a concern for many pipeline operators. Cracking may be either due to poor construction weld quality or due to stress corrosion cracking. Circumferential crack management techniques are not as mature as axial crack management techniques. This workshop is to provide a forum for open discussion for industry to discuss their concerns, successes and failures. The focus of these session will be the identification and management of circumferential cracking issues.

Who Should Attend?
Pipeline operators, ILI vendors, field NDE vendors, consultants or regulators involved in any aspects or crack or geohazard management.

Track Co-Chairs

  • Colin Scott, IRISNDT
  • Mohammad Al-Amin, TransCanada

Session C - Tuesday 15:30 PM
Room: MB Auditorium
Identification of Circumferential Cracking Issues in Pipelines

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Purpose:
To allow open discussion for pipeline industry members to share experiences in identifying circumferential cracking issues.
Description:
The focus of this session will be on susceptibility assessments, direct assessment techniques, inline inspection and field NDE techniques. The role of axial and bending stresses acting on circumferential cracks is important, and this will include comments on the role of environmental factors and geohazards in identifying areas of high susceptibility. The recent development of circumferential crack ILI tools will be discussed. Speakers with experience in circumferential crack inspection related issues will be invited to introduce the topic of discussion and share their experiences.

It is expected that the guest speakers and members of the audience will have a variety of experience, and the discussion may include comments on construction welds, stress corrosion cracking issues, geohazards, ILI tool development, and other related subjects.
Expected Outcome
The goal is to provide industry members to share experiences and learn from each other’s successes and failures.
Discussion Leaders

  • ILI Representative, NDT Global
  • ILI Representative, ROSEN
  • Andrew Greig, TransMountain Pipeline


Session G - Wednesday 15:30 PM
Room: MB Auditorium
Management of Circumferential Cracking in Pipelines

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Purpose:
To allow open discussion for pipeline industry members to share experiences in management of circumferential cracking issues.
Description:
The focus of this session will be on integrity assessment techniques available for circumferential cracks, direct assessment techniques, and the role geohazard management in circumferential crack management. Circumferential crack management has historically been a secondary concern to axial crack management, and this session will discuss the important differences. Integrity assessment techniques are not as mature as those available for axial cracks, or techniques from other industries. Speakers with experience in crack management related issues will be invited to introduce the topic of discussion and share their experiences.

It is expected that the guest speakers and members of the audience will have a variety of experience, and the discussion may include comments construction weld quality control, integrity assessment limitations, regulatory requirements, geohazard management, and others related subjects.
Expected Outcome
The goal is to provide industry members to share experiences and learn from each other’s successes and failures.
Discussion Leaders

  • Lyndon Lamborn, Enbridge
  • Mark Stevens, C-FER Technologies
  • Elvis SanJuan, Riverol (TCPL)


WG6 – Human Factors

Purpose:
To provide a forum for operators and vendors/consultants to discuss strategies to optimize their systems with consideration of human factors. Human Factors refers to environmental, organizational and job factors, as well as human and individual characteristics, which influence behavior at work in a way which can affect health and safety. The goal of the working group is to discuss strategies and tactics used to address Human Factors and design a system that makes it easy for people to do the right thing and difficult to do the wrong thing. Previous years helped to create awareness of human factors to make it “tangible” by “raising the bar”. This year, the goal is to make HF "applicable" and that people shift from "putting their finger on HF" to "pulling the trigger on applying HF"

The working group discuss the tools and techniques used by various parts of the pipeline community to assess human factors in the design and operation of a pipeline system.
For those planning on attending the human factors sessions, two half-day tutorials will be provided on Monday to provide the fundamentals of human factors as well as the integration of human factors into incident investigations. These tutorials will enable participants to actively discuss human factors issues and opportunities within their organizations and the pipeline industry during the WG #6 sessions.

Who Should Attend?
Front line workers and people leaders who have responsibility for pipeline control systems/SCADA, integrity analysis and evaluation, and integrity planning/execution.

Track Co-Chairs

  • Heather Kahle, Work Safe BC
  • Jason Kumagi, Optimal Fit Inc.

Session B - Tuesday 13:30 PM
Room: MB 252
Enhancing the Workplace System - Lessons from the Field

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Description:
This session features learnings from relevant case studies presented by discussion leader, Kathy Fox, Chair of the Transportation Safety Board. The case studies will be presented through the lens of system safety with facilitators highlighting observations, early findings, lessons learned and effective risk mitigation that were implemented to advance safety and improve system performance.

Key questions to be answered during this discussion-based session include:

  • What are the workplace elements to be considered during the performance of work or in unwanted consequences?
  • What Performance Influencing Factors may have influenced the work?
  • Describe lessons learned to advance safety and system performance?
  • Describe controls that have been implemented to optimize worker well-being or overall system performance?

Expected Outcome
The outcome of this workshop will be a collection of ‘lessons’ learned that can be documented and shared to promote knowledge transfer.

Discussion Lead

  • Kathy Fox, TSB

Facilitator

  • Jenny Colman, WorkSafeBC

Rapporteurs

  • TBA


Session C - Tuesday 15:30 PM
Room: MB 252
From Blue Sky to Real Practice – Building a Roadmap for Applying Human Factors in the Pipeline Industry

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Description:
A “blue sky” session was conducted in 2017. This was a creative effort for participants to think outside the box and consider how best to optimize system performance without constraints. For 2019, the discussion will build on this feedback to define a strategy incorporating the human factors roadmap for optimizing performance of systems in the pipeline industry over the next 10 years.

Key questions to be answered during this hands-on workshop include:

  • Discoveries/progress since the blue sky exercise in 2017?
  • Progress/gains/successes in advancing safety?
  • Avenues used: automate to reduce over reliance on people or optimize PIFs?
  • What tools used to identify, assess & mitigate risks?
  • Incident investigations complete? Effective?
  • Where are the priority areas? What defines a priority area? Incidents? Other?
  • Which topics are of greatest interest / need in the pipeline community to enhance the application of HF to optimize system performance?
  • What are the opportunities and challenges related to the priority human factors related topics? (Provide examples where possible)

Discussion will be encouraged for participants to share stories of success or challenges they have faced related to applying human factors to optimize system performance. The outcome of this workshop will be a roadmap to guide and priorize actions that are most effective and/or feasible for the pipeline industry to tackle over the next 10 years. This will help direct research projects and inform what sessions and practical tools are needed in 2021 and beyond.

Discussion Leaders

  • Jason Kumagai, Optimal Fit Inc
  • Jenny Colman, WorkSafeBC

Facilitator

  • Heather Kahle

Rapporteurs

  • TBA


WG7 – Pipeline Risk and Reliability Management

Purpose:
This working group provides participants with:

  1. Industry approach to overcoming challenges when performing risk assessments, including transitioning from qualitative to quantitative risk assessment, communicating risk results, and making effective decisions through risk assessment.
  2. Insights into the latest developments regarding the CSA Z662-2023 Annex B – Guidelines for Risk Assessment of Pipeline Systems, including the expansion on risk assessment guidance for both natural gas and liquid pipelines, and development of quantitative risk criteria to assure safety and environmental protection.

Half day tutorial on Risk Assessment will also be provided at 2019 Banff Workshop. It is recommended that attendees in Working Group 7 register for the tutorial, as it will provide an overview of the risk assessment process and stimulate an engaging discussion in the working groups.

Who Should Attend?
Managers, engineers, analysts, risk management experts who are involved in or are responsible for the development, implementation and / or ongoing refinement of risk and integrity management programs within their organizations should attend these workshops.

Track Co-Chairs

  • Alex Tomic, TransCanada
  • Dan Williams, Dynamic Risk

Session D - Wednesday 08:30 AM
Room: KC 303
Innovative Ways to Overcome Challenges in Performing Risk Assessments

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Purpose:
The aim of this session is to review best practice and innovative approaches available and being applied by pipeline operators for effectively performing risk assessments and addressing risk assessment challenges.
Description:
This will be accomplished through presentations, discussions and a collaborative review. Topics are expected to include:

  • Transitioning from qualitative to more quantitative approaches
  • Quantifying difficult threats that are not supported by a reliability-based approach
  • System-wide versus site specific assessments and considerations; existing pipeline vs. new pipeline construction considerations
  • Consequence estimation approaches
  • Effectively presenting and communicating risk results throughout various organizational levels and at different levels of scale (i.e. corporate/integrity department and pipeline/segment)
  • Establishing risk tolerance criteria
  • Integrating risk assessment results for supporting effective decision making; aligning risk assessment such that it informs integrity management activities
  • Developing Preventive and Mitigative Measures (P&MM) based on risk results

Expected Outcome:
An understanding of the latest risk assessment advancements and challenges faced by the pipeline operators.


Session F - Wednesday 13:30 PM
Room: MB Auditorium
Update on the Development of Comprehensive Risk Assessment Guidance and Associated Criteria for CSA Z662-2023 Annex B – Guidelines for Risk Assessment of Pipeline Systems

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Purpose:
This session will provide the attendees with a view into the development of the guidance, what the criteria will look like, and how this will impact the pipeline integrity management in Canada. .
Description:
Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Z662 is the pipeline design and integrity standard in Canada. This standard is comprised of several parts and annexes, with Annex B specifically providing high level guidance on how to perform Risk Assessment for pipelines. This Annex will be significantly expanded in 2023, with development of detailed guidance on how to effectively perform risk assessment, with the focus on quantitative risk assessment, and development of risk criteria for both natural gas and liquid pipelines. This innovative development will make Z662 the first North American standard to provide guidance on quantitative risk assessment, and the associated criteria.
Expected Outcome:
It is expected that this working group will provide insight into the latest development on guidance for risk assessment and the risk criteria to ensure safety and environmental protection, to be included in CSA Z662-2023, and how to effectively overcome challenges in performing risk assessments, which includes both performing risk assessments, communicating the results, and making effective decisions using these results.


WG8 – Inspection and Monitoring

Who Should Attend?
Managers, engineers, analysts, and other integrity management experts who are involved in or are responsible for the development, implementation and / or ongoing refinement of integrity programs to manage mainline or facilities integrity should attend these workshops.

Track Co-Chairs

  • Kevin Siggers, ROSEN
  • Candace Sander, Interpipeline
  • Steven Bott, Enbridge

Session A - Tuesday 10:30 AM
Room: MB Auditorium
Aligning with New Inspection Technologies

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Purpose:
The goal of this session is to discuss what techniques can be used to assist in validating new technologies and to share experiences of other inspection technologies operators have used in their integrity programs to solve a specific program.
Description:
With an ever-increasing demand on the Operator’s integrity programs, numerous new technologies are used to fill in the gaps in knowledge.  Inevitably with new technologies there is a validation phase where the technology is proven so the results can be trusted.  In most cases tens to hundreds of validation digs are not feasible and the operators have to rely on other techniques to gain confidence in their program.  Aligning additional of types of data is often used to give the operator confidence in their decision and help to reduce their uncertainty in the new technologies.  Case studies will be presented that highlight some approaches using new inspection technologies and building an analysis around the results. From this there will be a discussion of experiences of other inspection technologies operators have used in their integrity programs to solve a specific program.
Expected Outcome:
Increased understanding of technologies available to solve specific integrity concerns and methods or techniques to ensure successful implementation of the new technologies.
Discussion Leaders

  • Ollie Burkinshaw, ROSEN
  • Garry Sommer, Enbridge


Session D - Wednesday 08:30 AM
Room: MB Auditorium
Inspection vs. Program Performance: The Vendor-Operator Divide

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Purpose:
The goal of this session is to discuss how vendors and operators treat ILI performance differently, and how they can work together to address both inspection performance validation and effective integrity management programs through improved collaboration.
Description:
Operators are tasked with insuring the safe operation of their pipeline, and as such must react to ILI calls that could impact the effectiveness of their management program, commonly known as an outlier.  As such, an area of potential conflict between operators and in-line inspection (ILI) vendors is related to validation that the ILI tool is meeting the stated specification and what that means to the operator and the vendor.  While an outlier may be caused by errors in the ILI data collection and analysis, it could also be caused by the presence of flaws outside of the tool’s design envelope or may be an artifact of the expected measurement uncertainty.
Expected Outcome:
Sharing of experiences, practices, and results.
Discussion Leaders

  • Jerome Bonnal, NEB
  • Thomas Hennig, NDT Global


WG9 – External Corrosion

Purpose:
We will explore the challenges the pipeline industry currently faces related to compliance to new standards, participation in the Electrolysis Registry and AC corrosion.

Who Should Attend?
Managers, engineers, analysts, and risk management experts who are involved in or responsible for the development, implementation, and/or ongoing external corrosion program development, management and/or continuous improvement. Individuals responsible for compliance assurance in an organization may be interested in Session 1.

Track Co-Chairs

  • Corey Kruchkowski, Western Pipeline Compliance
  • Brent Dorman, Corrosion Services

Session A - Tuesday 10:30 AM
Room: KC 305
Updates to Corrosion Standards

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Purpose:
To provide updates to CSA standards including Z245.30 field applied coatings.
Description:
This is a co-session with WG2 focused on updates to CSA standards including Z245.30 field applied coatings. This session will be in a panel format to facilitate questions on the standards and application of the standards by the operating and vendor communities.
Expected Outcome:
The anticipated outcomes of this session include:

  • Increased understanding of the new standards and application of these standards
  • Development of a gap analysis pertaining to current standards and future desired standards


Session E - Wednesday 10:30 AM
Room: KC 305
Electrolysis Registry: Why You Need It

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Purpose:
This session is designed to bring awareness of the Electrolysis Registry to the operating community.
Description:
Electrolytic corrosion is a process of accelerated corrosion. In this process, a metallic surface is continuously corroded by other metal it is in contact with, due to an electrolyte and the flow of an electrical current between the two metals, caused from an external source of electromotive force (EMF).
Expected Outcome:
The anticipated outcome of this session is to bring awareness of and support for the Electrolysis Registry.


Session F - Wednesday 13:30 PM
Room: KC 305
New AC Corrosion Guidelines and Implementation Case Study

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Purpose:
To introduce new AC corrosion guidelines and provide an example of Implementation of these guidelines.
Description:
New AC corrosion guidelines are available to the operating community. Through an explanation of the guideline and a case study example of implementation of the guidelines, this session will provide support to the operating communities in understanding and implementation of AC corrosion mitigation.
Expected Outcome:
The anticipated outcomes of this session include:

  • Increased understanding of the new AC corrosion guideline
  • Provide operators with an example of how to implement the AC corrosion guideline


WG10 – Internal Corrosion

Purpose:
The purpose of this work group is to provide a forum for participants to discuss challenges faced in managing Internal Corrosion and an opportunity so share experiences and solutions in areas such as monitoring techniques, test methods, key performance indicators and advances in technology.

Track Co-Chairs

  • Tim Ross, Pure HM
  • Bala Ganapathy, Plains Midstream
  • Budd Melvin

Session A - Tuesday 10:30 AM
Room: MB 252
Internal Corrosion Key Performance Indicators

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Purpose:
Discuss KPIs regarding internal corrosion. What are metrics currently being used? Are they meaningful and what are the outcomes? How do they improve current Internal Corrosion Programs?
Description:
Sankara Papavinasam will lead a discussion on KPI’s and share their experiences in best practices and lessons learned.
Expected Outcome:
Industry consensus on some meaningful key performance indicators and areas for improvement.


Session E - Wednesday 10:30 AM
Room: MB 252
Research and Collaboration

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Purpose:
Discuss advances in research and test methodologies and provide an update on current joint industry projects and areas for further research. Participants are encouraged to discuss their experiences and identify as a group / industry any gaps and suggested areas for improvement and future research topics.
Description:
Frank Hornsby will bring his extensive experience to this session and will lead a discussion on corrosivity testing for crude oil and to open the floor to discuss test methods, and innovative ways to test things like corrosion inhibitors.
Tamer Crosby of InnoTech Alberta will lead a discussion on current joint industry projects (PRCI / Innotech Alberta) and research on pigging and chemical programs.
Expected Outcome:
Identify areas for further research and collaboration regarding Internal Corrosion monitoring and test methods.


WG11 – Managing Geohazards

Purpose:
This working group will facilitate discussion about the difference between the current state of geohazard management science and the current regulatory requirements. There will be two back-to-back sessions for this discussion.

Regulation aims to protect the public interest by requiring that owners and operators follow specific practices or take remedial action based on certain observed conditions. Though well intentioned, regulation may specify actions or practices that are not be well supported by science, thus potentially diverting resources to address areas of low or negligible risk.

For those planning to attend the natural hazard sessions, a full day tutorial will also be provided on Monday to provide the fundamentals of geohazard management, which will enable participants to actively participate in the session discussions.

Who Should Attend?
Pipeline integrity staff, managers, regulators, consultants and operators who are involved with management and monitoring of geohazards, in addition to individuals responsible to ensure compliance to regulations, codes and standards related to geohazard management.

Track Co-Chairs

  • John Richmond, Enbridge
  • Rod Read, RSRead Consulting Inc
  • Rick Guthrie, Stantec

Session B - Tuesday 13:30 PM
Room: KC 305
Geohazards: How do we close the gap between science and regulation with respect to geohazard management? (Part 1)

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Purpose:
To engage in a facilitated conversation with the intention that all parties want to reduce pipeline risk and liability and to identify gaps between science and regulation and determine ways to close those gaps.
Description:
Regulation aims to protect the public interest by requiring that owners and operators follow specific practices or take remedial action based on certain observed conditions. Though well intentioned, regulation may specify actions or practices that are not be well supported by science, thus potentially diverting resources to address areas of low or negligible risk.
Expected Outcome:
The sessions will provide a venue to share experiences, progress, needs and challenges of those responsible to manage geohazards and pipelines.

Feedback from the working group will be used to inform future research and identify priority topics to develop for the pipeline community. An outcome paper on required focus efforts will also be produced.


Session C - Tuesday 15:30 PM
Room: KC 301
Geohazards: How do we close the gap between science and regulation with respect to geohazard management? (Part 2)

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Purpose:
To engage in a facilitated conversation with the intention that all parties want to reduce pipeline risk and liability and to identify gaps between science and regulation and determine ways to close those gaps.
Description:
Regulation aims to protect the public interest by requiring that owners and operators follow specific practices or take remedial action based on certain observed conditions. Though well intentioned, regulation may specify actions or practices that are not be well supported by science, thus potentially diverting resources to address areas of low or negligible risk.
Expected Outcome:
The sessions will provide a venue to share experiences, progress, needs and challenges of those responsible to manage geohazards and pipelines.

Feedback from the working group will be used to inform future research and identify priority topics to develop for the pipeline community. An outcome paper on required focus efforts will also be produced.


WG12 – Emergency Preparedness and Response

Purpose:
This working group provides participants with:

  1. Increased awareness of recent and ongoing initiatives related to “sharing and collaboration” in pipeline emergency preparedness and response (EPR)
  2. An update on progress and initiatives related to the topic since BPW 2017.
  3. An opportunity to discuss and influence future improvements in this area related to EPR
  4. Increased knowledge for becoming champions of sharing and collaboration as it relates to EPR within their own organizations

Who Should Attend?
Managers, engineers, analysts, risk management experts, and emergency management experts who are involved in or are responsible for the development, implementation and/or ongoing refinement of EPR within their organizations should attend these workshops.

Track Co-Chairs

  • Kent Lien, National Energy Board
  • Stephen Lloyd, Enbridge

Session F - Wednesday 13:30 PM
Room: KC 301
Advancing Emergency Preparedness and Response through Collaboration and Cooperation

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Purpose:
Regulatory change, changing business practices, and increasing public expectations are driving initiatives aimed at enhancing collaboration and cooperation in emergency preparedness and response for pipelines. There are many players in the broader emergency management system and effective emergency preparedness and response requires cooperation and collaboration among all these players across jurisdictional boundaries. Ongoing liaison, consultation, and education are required by pipeline operators with Indigenous groups, federal, provincial, and municipal governments, and associated first responders. To set the stage, perspectives on collaboration and cooperation will be shared by discussion leaders with varied backgrounds and experiences. This will be followed by a facilitated discussion with the audience.
Description:
The session will be four panelists briefly sharing their views and setting the context for additional discussion, followed by a facilitated discussion considering oral questions and questions from the “twitter” feed.
Expected Outcome:

  • Enhanced technical and process knowledge
  • Collaboration and conversation amongst all attendees
  • Identification of future initiatives aimed at improving EPR